首页
登录 | 注册

FR在国外的报道

留下来慢慢看。

 China cracks down on the sex bloggers
  By David Eimer in Beijing
  Published: 17 July 2005
  
  For the hundreds of thousands of people who log on to Furong Jiejie's website daily, her saucy self-portraits and delusional diary entries ("I have a physique that gives men nosebleeds") provide something to talk and laugh about during breaks at work. But the dizzying rise of Furong, who has become the most talked-about woman in China, has prompted the Chinese government to assert further its control over cyberspace.
  
  With about 100 million users, China has the second-largest internet population in the world after the US, and it's growing by millions each month. To monitor what these increasingly curious "netizens" are reading about, the authorities have intensified their internet surveillance by recruiting "web watchdogs" to anonymously police thousands of cyber-cafes and public message forums. And all Chinese websites, bloggers and bulletin-board operators must register with the government - or be fined and shut down.
  
  Furong Jiejie - the name literally means "hibiscus older sister" - seems likely to face that fate. "We have been keeping an eye on sister Furong," said Liu Qiang, an official with the Ministry Of Culture, which is responsible for overseeing the internet. "But there aren't any explicit regulations to control such a phenomenon." The latest in a series of online celebrities, known in China as BB, or bulletin-board, stars, to have emerged in the past couple of years, 28-year-old Furong is an unlikely candidate to run into trouble with the authorities.
  
  Prone to posing in provocative photos - tame by Western standards - Furong has an obvious hunger for fame. She hardly seems a threat to society.
  
  Nevertheless, the publicity department of the central committee of the Communist Party has told BlogChina, the largest provider of blog-hosting services, to relocate content relating to Furong, whose real name is Shi Heng-xia, to less prominent parts of their website.
  
  That's what happened to Mu Zi-mei, a 27-year-old magazine journalist, in late 2003, after she became equally famous by publishing an explicit online diary detailing her busy sex life.
  
  The government's heavy-handed approach is an indication of its ambivalent attitude towards the internet. "The government sees the internet as vital for China's technological progress but, at the same time, they want to stop people from accessing content they see as unhealthy," says Chen Changfeng, deputy dean of Beijing University's School of Journalism and Communications. That includes political dissent and pornography.
  
  Most print and TV media in China are local rather than national, making the internet an even more powerful tool. "The internet is omnipotent now. If something happens in Guangzhou, then people in Beijing will hear about it quickly ... People can check the news and immediately respond to it by posting their opinion," notes Ms Chen. "What the internet in China does is help to form public opinion very quickly."
  
  The anti-Japan protests in March and April began on-line, with millions venting their anger in open forums over a history textbook that downplayed Japanese army atrocities during the Second World War. Only later did the traditional media pick up on the story. It's been the same with Furong Jiejie, whose photo adorned the front pages of many papers last week. Now, though, it seems that her 15 minutes of fame are up.
  
  For the hundreds of thousands of people who log on to Furong Jiejie's website daily, her saucy self-portraits and delusional diary entries ("I have a physique that gives men nosebleeds") provide something to talk and laugh about during breaks at work. But the dizzying rise of Furong, who has become the most talked-about woman in China, has prompted the Chinese government to assert further its control over cyberspace.
  
  With about 100 million users, China has the second-largest internet population in the world after the US, and it's growing by millions each month. To monitor what these increasingly curious "netizens" are reading about, the authorities have intensified their internet surveillance by recruiting "web watchdogs" to anonymously police thousands of cyber-cafes and public message forums. And all Chinese websites, bloggers and bulletin-board operators must register with the government - or be fined and shut down.
  
  Furong Jiejie - the name literally means "hibiscus older sister" - seems likely to face that fate. "We have been keeping an eye on sister Furong," said Liu Qiang, an official with the Ministry Of Culture, which is responsible for overseeing the internet. "But there aren't any explicit regulations to control such a phenomenon." The latest in a series of online celebrities, known in China as BB, or bulletin-board, stars, to have emerged in the past couple of years, 28-year-old Furong is an unlikely candidate to run into trouble with the authorities.
  
  Prone to posing in provocative photos - tame by Western standards - Furong has an obvious hunger for fame. She hardly seems a threat to society.
  
  Nevertheless, the publicity department of the central committee of the Communist Party has told BlogChina, the largest provider of blog-hosting services, to relocate content relating to Furong, whose real name is Shi Heng-xia, to less prominent parts of their website.
  That's what happened to Mu Zi-mei, a 27-year-old magazine journalist, in late 2003, after she became equally famous by publishing an explicit online diary detailing her busy sex life.
  
  The government's heavy-handed approach is an indication of its ambivalent attitude towards the internet. "The government sees the internet as vital for China's technological progress but, at the same time, they want to stop people from accessing content they see as unhealthy," says Chen Changfeng, deputy dean of Beijing University's School of Journalism and Communications. That includes political dissent and pornography.
  
  Most print and TV media in China are local rather than national, making the internet an even more powerful tool. "The internet is omnipotent now. If something happens in Guangzhou, then people in Beijing will hear about it quickly ... People can check the news and immediately respond to it by posting their opinion," notes Ms Chen. "What the internet in China does is help to form public opinion very quickly."
  
  The anti-Japan protests in March and April began on-line, with millions venting their anger in open forums over a history textbook that downplayed Japanese army atrocities during the Second World War. Only later did the traditional media pick up on the story. It's been the same with Furong Jiejie, whose photo adorned the front pages of many papers last week. Now, though, it seems that her 15 minutes of fame are up.


相关文章

  • LeaRun.Framework━ .NET快速开发框架 ━ 工作流程组件介绍
    LeaRun.Framework.NET,基于.NET的快速开发框架.整合框架,为企业或个人在.NET环境下快速开发系统提供了强大的支持,开发人员不需要开发系统的基础功能和公共模块,框架自身提供了强大的函数库和开发包,开发人员只须集中精力专 ...
  • 基于<MySQL学习分享--MySQL 5.7性能改进>文中提到的事务锁的优化,MySQL在5.6之前,trx_sys事务锁一直是影响性能的主要因素.在应用中也会经常发现系统资源利用不起来,追查的结果往往是trx_sys事务锁的 ...
  • 紧随<MySQL学习分享 --机型选择和配置>,虽然没有什么太多的反应和关注,但前进的步伐没有停止.小插曲:电脑被儿子摔坏了,突然感觉失去了方向.忍不住到网吧来看技术文章,似乎有些格格不入,粗鲁嘈杂的声音,并没有影响我的专注和文 ...
  • 经常做恢复验证,每次都有些小不同,想省点事,搞个一键还原可好?适用于不同实例,源端和目标端最好版本一致,平台一致,开始吧. 步骤介绍: #适用oracle 11g单机环境 #备份在192.168.1.1的RESTORDIR目录下,采用rma ...
  • 1,安装docker toolbox,virtualbox 2,注册阿里docker加速器,提供一个加速地址 这一步不是必须,但是个人觉得还是有必要做一下.服务器在国外,你懂的. docker-machine create --engine ...
  • 纯干货,无废话. 写在前面的话: PostgreSQL 数据库软件从 10 版本开始,就不再支持 SCO OpenServer6 系统了,但这并不代表我们无法在 SCO OpenServer 6 系统上安装使用 PostgreSQL 10 ...

2020 unjeep.com webmaster#unjeep.com
12 q. 0.013 s.
京ICP备10005923号